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April 16, 2007

Comments

Maura

I have been spinning for a couple of years now and have thought, gee why not spin two yarns at once? But i thought it was probably too difficult, or other people would already be doing it. Wrong! Hmm. Must set up great wheel with a second spindle.

I did, indeed! In person for the first time, but Ive been talking to them about the project from the outset. Fascinating all the variations on a spinning theme there are, isnt it?

Lynn

Did you see Jonathan Bosworth's Han wheel reproduction? Had to come and check out your images again, after seeing his recreation at Rhinebeck last weekend. Yes, the foot treadles are like bicycling to push an oar around in circles.

TERRY

HI - I HAVE A SPINNING WHEEL LIKE THE SECOND ONE SHOWN IN THE ABOVE PICTURE. I BOUGHT IT AT A ESTATE AUCTION 7 IT WAS DESCRIBED AS A CHINESE SPINNING WHEEL. I WAS GOING TO POST A PHOTO, BUT NOT SURE HOW?

Michael

This is a cool wheel!

I've seen some silk-throwing wheels that had LOTS of spindles - of course, they're not dealing with drafting.
http://www.rdricketts.com/strands.html
This design has the spindles on a circle, and explains how it works: http://www.ingenious.org.uk/See/Tradeandindustry/Textileindustry/?target=SeeMedium&ObjectID=%7BA0A6826E-FFFC-202F-06E2-BA010B2DA5A7%7D&viewby=images

I'm fascinated with the stick! It's amazing how well things work, once you figure out the right tools!

Cheryl

Totally fascinating. Wouldn't it be great to take a trip over there and study some of their fiber arts traditions? What a shame I wasn't a spinner when I was in Hong Kong.

Cindy D

The links I listed above are of Chinese spinning wheels I found when I searched Google images with the search phrase "Chinese spinning wheels"

The first image is described as Antique Chinese Silk Spinning Wheel. The second is labeled as just a Chinese spinning wheel.

Cindy D

Fascinating construction!
Here are some links to peruse:

http://www.dotucson.com/shop/orienteast/img/wheel.jpg

http://www.passportscollection.com/ProductImages/Product298.jpg

Laurie

I'm a doctor, not an engineer, so I can't offer any insight. But it's amazing how many variations actually can work.

Tallguy

Yes, I like the concept of a rowing machine with regards to the treadle. Since it is connected quite closely to the hub, there won't be a lot of movement, and the operator would sort of walk through it. There would be the slightest circular action with the feet. I can see this working quite well.

The most interesting thing are the spindles! While, technically, it should be possible to spin 2 or even 3 yarns at once, but I don't think I could do it. The movements with the hands should all be the same, so you might as well do 2 or 3 at the same time and get more done. This all comes down again to proper preparation of your punis! When you have that, the spinning sort of takes care of itself -- you just have to go through the motions.

cyndy

Great images! Do the engraving or photo indicate what area of China they are from.?....
..maybe it would help in ascertaining the origin of this style of wheel?

Very interesting wheel, thanks for posting about it!

janel

oh yeah, I like the kid in the basket too.

janel

Very interesting wheel. I would guess based on the u-shape of the pivot support and the location of the attachment to the wheel spoke plus the fact that the wheel is situated perpendicular to the spinner instead of in front of the spinner, that the large "treadle" is really acting more like an oar and that the spinner uses both feet to "row" the wheel around by rotating the "treadle".

I am curious how the spinner manages to spin 3 or even 2 different punis at the same time. At first looking at the photograph, I was guessing they were both drafting off the same puni, but in the engraving she is clearly holding more than one puni. This sounds like it needs an experiment! Although, if you were spinning properly it shouldn't take much effort in the fiber holding hand and the other hand would be the "regulator" keeping track that all the threads are flowing nicely.

Thanks for a great post!

fibergal

The amazing thing about the engraving is just how she is holding the fibers. Wouldn't the cotton tangle in the hand? It looks like it makes a rowing motion with her foot to me. Makes one just itch to try this wheel, doesn't it?

Sharon

I was struck by the similarity to mice in a cage and the structure of the wheel on her left. That must be her eight-hour-a-day job - no joy there. She looks resigned. I love to spin but I wouldn't want to be her. It looks rather like the modern rowing machine exercise equipment.

Sylvia

AA and SG don't have the bandwidth to view your blog -- could you print a copy of this post, mail it to them, and see what they say? Fascinating!

Carole

It's very intriguing and I've certainly never seen anything like it. It would sure take up a lot of room!

Janice in GA

A very early interpretation of a double-treadle wheel, eh?

It seems to me that there would have to be some rotation going on at the end of the "treadle" away from the wheel. I know there would be with a straight shaft-- just not sure how much the curved shaft would change the picture. However, IANAME, so I'm just WAGing. :)

Beth S.

But can it ply? ;-)

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